Literary Studies

From To Kill a Mockingbird to Harry Potter and The Prisoner Of Azkaban, from Henry James to American Literary Scholarship, we can help you find the literary studies books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.

Top Sellers in Literary Studies

To Kill a Mockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbird

by Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird is a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. It was instantly successful and has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on the author's observations of her family and neighbors, as well as on an event that occurred near her hometown in 1936, when she was 10 years old. The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with serious issues of rape and racial inequality.
Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice

by Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice is the second novel by English author Jane Austen, after Sense and Sensibility. First published on 28 January 1813, Austen sold the copyright for just £110.  Its manuscript was initially written between 1796 and 1797 in Steventon, Hampshire, where Austen lived in the rectory. Originally called First Impressions, it was never published under that title, and in following revisions it was retitled Pride and Prejudice. It was first published anonymously. A... Read more about this item
The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby

by F Scott Fitzgerald

Written in 1925, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is widely
considered to be one of the author’s greatest works. Set in New York City and
Long Island during the Roaring Twenties, the focus of the story is (of course)
its title character, Jay Gatsby, and his unswerving desire to be reunited with
Daisy Buchanan, the love he lost five years earlier. However, Nick Carraway,
who happens to be both Gatsby’s neighbor and Daisy’s cousin, narrates Gatsby's journey
from poverty to wealth, into the... Read more about this item
Animal Farm

Animal Farm

by George Orwell

Animal Farm is a dystopian novella by George Orwell. Published in England on 17 August 1945, the book reflects events leading up to and during the Stalin era before World War II. Orwell, a democratic socialist and a member of the Independent Labour Party for many years, was a critic of Joseph Stalin and was suspicious of Moscow-directed Stalinism after his experiences with the NKVD during the Spanish Civil War.
Gone With the Wind

Gone With the Wind

by Margaret Mitchell

Margaret Mitchell only published one complete novel, but it was quite the book - Gone With the Wind earned her the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 and National Book Award for 1936. The epic romance tale set in and around Atlanta, Georgia during the American Civil War has remained a bestseller, even before the equally popular film starring Clark Gable and Vivian Leigh was made in 1939.
The Catcher In the Rye

The Catcher In the Rye

by J D Salinger

Published in 1951, The Catcher in the Rye has become a common part of high school and college curricula throughout the English-speaking world and has been translated into all major languages. Since its publication with a $3.00 sticker, it has reportedly sold more than 65 million copies. The novel's antihero, Holden Caulfield, has become a cultural icon for teenage rebellion. Due to its liberal use of profanity and portrayal of sexuality and teenage angst, it has frequently been... Read more about this item
Nineteen Eighty-Four

Nineteen Eighty-Four

by George Orwell

Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) by George
Orwell has become the definitive dystopian novel of the twentieth
century. Originally published on June 8, 1949 by Secker and
Warburg in the United Kingdom, the book follows the main character,
Winston Smith, through his disillusionment with totalitarianism and a
doomed struggle of resistance. George Orwell is a pen-name, Orwell's
real name was Eric Blair. -
A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol

by Charles Dickens

The full title of Charles Dickens' most famous work is technically A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost-Story of Christmas. This novella was published on December 19, 1843, and the first edition run of 6000 copies were sold out by Christmas Eve of that year. The publication of the first edition was fraught with complications, and even though the book was received to positive reviews, profits of the book fell far below Dickens' expectations, and the financial strain caused rifts between Dickens and... Read more about this item
The Old Man and The Sea

The Old Man and The Sea

by Ernest Hemingway

This novella, only 140 pages, was first
printed in its entirety in Life Magazine on September 1, 1952. It inspired a buying frenzy - selling over five million copies of the
magazine in just two days!
The story about an aging Cuban
fisherman wrangling a large marlin in the gulf stream was written in
1951 in Cuba and published in 1952. In 1953, it won the Pulitzer Prize
for Fiction and led to Hemingway's nomination for the Nobel Prize in
Literature in 1954.
Man's struggle against nature is the... Read more about this item
The Grapes Of Wrath

The Grapes Of Wrath

by John Steinbeck

John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath
stands as a pivotal piece of American literature. The story follows
the Joad family (and thousands of others) as they are driven from the
Oklahoma farm where they are sharecroppers during the Great
Depression. The drought, economic hardship, and changes in financial
and agricultural industries send them searching for dignity and
honest work in the bountiful state of California.


The novel earned Steinbeck the Pulitzer
Prize for fiction in 1940, and inspired the... Read more about this item
Ulysses

Ulysses

by James Joyce

Ulysses is a modernist novel by James Joyce. It was first
serialized in The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920 and later
published by Shakespeare and Company in 1922. Originally, Joyce conceived of
Ulysses as a short story to be included in Dubliners, but decided instead to
publish it as a long novel, situated as a sort of sequel to A Portrait of the
Artist as a Young Man, picking up Stephen Dedalus’s life over a year later.
Ulysses takes place on a single day, June 16, 1904, in Dublin -... Read more about this item
Harry Potter and The Goblet Of Fire

Harry Potter and The Goblet Of Fire

by J K Rowling

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the fourth book in the Harry Potter Series, written by J.K. Rowling. The widely acclaimed novel was granted the Hugo Award, the only Harry Potter book to receive the highly coveted fantasy and science fiction prize. First published by Bloomsbury in 2000, the fantasy novel follows Harry Potter, a wizard in his fourth year of magical education at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. The main event of the year is the Triwizard Tournament, a recently revived... Read more about this item
The Odyssey

The Odyssey

by Homer

Listen, O Muse, and hear my song, Of the great adventures that took so long, Of the noble Odysseus, king of Ithaca, Whose journey was filled with many a setback.The tale begins with the end of the Trojan War, When the Greeks set sail from the Trojan shore. Odysseus and his men faced many a danger, From the wrath of the gods to the Cyclops' anger.They sailed through storms and fought with beasts, But despite all odds, they made it to their feast, And there, in the halls of the goddess Circe, Odysseus... Read more about this item
Brave New World

Brave New World

by Huxley Aldous

Brave New World is a novel by Aldous Huxley, written in 1931 and published in 1932. Set in the London of AD 2540 (632 A.F. in the book), the novel anticipates developments in reproductive technology and sleep-learning that combine to change society. The future society is an embodiment of the ideals that form the basis of futurism. Huxley answered this book with a reassessment in an essay, Brave New World Revisited (1958), and with his final work, a novel titled Island (1962), both summarized below. In... Read more about this item
Dracula

Dracula

by Bram Stoker

Dracula is a gothic horror book written by Bram Stoker and published in 1897. The story is told through a series of journal entries, letters, and newspaper articles, and it follows the efforts of a group of people led by Professor Abraham Van Helsing to defeat the vampire Count Dracula.Dracula by Bram Stoker has been attributed to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, the gothic novel, and invasion literature. It has become a cultural icon, spawning countless adaptations in... Read more about this item
Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre

by Charlotte Bronte

Jane Eyre is a famous and influential novel by the English writer Charlotte Brontë. It was published in London, England in 1847 by Smith, Elder & Co. with the title Jane Eyre, an Autobiography under the pen name "Currer Bell". Orphaned as a child, Jane felt like an outcast during her childhood. She was sent by her cruel aunt to a boarding school where she was met with further torment. After the devastating loss of a friend, she finds herself enrolled under a new headmaster at the Lowood School... Read more about this item
Things Fall Apart

Things Fall Apart

by Chinua Achebe

In his debut novel, Chinua Achebe challenges our written perspective of history and portrays the devastating influence of colonization in late 19th century Nigeria.  Things Fall Apart explores one man's futile resistance to the devaluing of his Igbo traditions by British political and religious forces and his despair as his community capitulates to the powerful new order. The story follows Okonkwo, a man known for his fierce heart and physical strength, as he navigates his personal demons and his... Read more about this item
The Wind In the Willows

The Wind In the Willows

by Kenneth Grahame

The Wind in the Willows is a classic children's book by Kenneth Grahame, published in 1908. The story follows the adventures of four animal friends - Mole, Rat, Badger, and Toad - as they explore the English countryside, battle against weasels and stoats, and learn about the value of friendship, loyalty, and the joys of a simple life. Through their adventures, the characters discover the importance of home and the pleasures of a peaceful existence. With its charming characters, vivid descriptions of... Read more about this item
Lord Of the Flies

Lord Of the Flies

by William Golding

 
Even though Lord of the Flies
is a frequent submission on any banned books list, many high school
students are first introduced to this classic piece of literature in
their freshman English class. Using very young protagonists set in a
harsh, wild environment, author William Golding's disturbing and
engaging novel addresses the themes of human nature and personal
welfare, often resulting in violence and murder. Despite its
controversial subject matter, it is often considered one of the best
novels... Read more about this item
Rebecca

Rebecca

by Daphne Du Maurier

An orphaned young woman working as a maid is swept off her feet by a wealthy widowed Englishman, and quickly married him. But when she arrives at his estate she learns she pales in comparison with his seemingly perfect deceased first wife Rebecca, especially in the eyes of the sinister housekeeper Mrs. Danvers. When Rebecca’s body is found on her shipwrecked boat the dark secrets held by the husband are discovered as well. Rebecca has had many adaptations in film, radio, and television,... Read more about this item
The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

by Mark Twain

Commonly named among the Great American novels, The Adventures of
Huckleberry Finn, written by Mark Twain, is generally regarded as the
sequel to his earlier novel, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; however, in
Huckleberry Finn, Twain focused increasingly on the institution of
slavery and the South. Narrated by Huckleberry “Huck” Finn in Southern
antebellum vernacular, the novel gives vivid descriptions of people and
daily life along the Mississippi River while following the adventure of
Huck and... Read more about this item
Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights

by Emily Bronte

Wuthering Heights, the only book written by Emily Brontë, and originally published in 1847 by Thomas Cautley Newby under the pseudonym Ellis Bell, is a classic work of English literature. The Brontë sisters are known for classical and important literature, such as Jane Eyre (by Charlotte Brontë) and Agnes Grey (by Anne Brontë). The first edition of Wuthering Heights was first published in three volumes, the first two composed of Wuthering Heights, with the third volume containing Anne... Read more about this item
One Hundred Years Of Solitude

One Hundred Years Of Solitude

by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

One Hundred Years of Solitude chronicles the life of Macondo, a fictional town based in part of Garcia Marquez's hometown of Aracataca, Columbia, and seven generations of the founding family, the Buendias. He creates a complex world with characters and events that display the full range of human experience. For the reader, the pleasure of the novel derives from its fast-paced narrative, humor, vivid characters, and fantasy elements. In this 'magic realism', the author combines imaginative flights of... Read more about this item
Romeo and Juliet

Romeo and Juliet

by William Shakespeare

Romeo and Juliet is one of the English playwright and poet William Shakespeare's most beloved and popular plays, remaining since its premiere one of the most performed as well. The story was derived by Shakespeare (1564 - 1616) from many sources. The version most contemporary to his own was the 1562 poem "The Tragicall History of Romeus and Juliet" by Arthur Brooke, which was an adaptation of a French piece by Pierre Boaistuau Boaistuau had adapted from the Italian. Indeed, aspects of the tragic story... Read more about this item
Harry Potter and The Prisoner Of Azkaban

Harry Potter and The Prisoner Of Azkaban

by J K Rowling

“Harry Potter is a wizard. He is in his third year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. It's always a relief after summer with the Dursleys, however, Harry doesn't realize that this year will be just as eventful as the last two! The atmosphere at Hogwarts is tense. There's an escaped mass murderer on the loose, even the Muggles have been warned. The sinister prison guards of Azkaban have been called in to guard the school and Harry, Ron and Hermione rapidly discover why all witches and... Read more about this item

Literary Studies Books & Ephemera

Henry James

Henry James

by Markow-Totevy, Georges

Scott Fitzgerald

Scott Fitzgerald

by Turnbull, Andrew

The Roving Critic

The Roving Critic

by Van Doren, Carl

Dhlawrence

Dhlawrence

by Kingsmill, Hugh

Great Spiritual Writers Of America

Great Spiritual Writers Of America

by Fitch, George Hamlin

Old and New Masters

Old and New Masters

by Lynd, Robert

Albert Camus

Albert Camus

by Albert Maquet -

Dylan Thomas a Biography

Dylan Thomas a Biography

by Ferris, Paul

Dickens and Melville In Their Time

Dickens and Melville In Their Time

by Solomon, Pearl Chesler

Dhlawrence Novelist

Dhlawrence Novelist

by Leavis, F R

The Writings Of Jm Synge

The Writings Of Jm Synge

by Skelton, Robin

American Literary Scholarship

American Literary Scholarship

by Woodress, James